(Black) Lightning Does Strike Twice

The CW threw there hat in the inclusive ring with last year’s announcement of D.C.’s Black Lightning. After the success of their mostly white superhero shows – adding Supergirl two years ago- it was time D.C.’s first African American star shined. Akin to Marvel’s Luke Cage, Lightning struck in the 1970s off the popularity of blaxploitation culture. Afros and jive populated the original comic as Jefferson Pierce, a crime fighter wielding the ability to control electricity, fought injustice. Decades later as the comic genre booms along with the need for fairer representation, Black Lightning strikes back in 2018.

While many blerds rejoiced at the thought of seeing this character come to life, there was an equal level of apprehension. This is The CW we are talking about. Other than Jane the Virgin and supporting casts on the comic titles, accurate potrayals of blacks and POC was scarce. And when rumors buzzed of a Black Lives Matters episode of Arrow, even the ancestors rolled their eyes. Luckily Black Lightning’s success is sewed by Salim and Mara Brock Akil.

The coupled screenwriters behind Girlfriends and Being Mary Jane deliver a relevant and substantial black family drama with hero elements. From this vantage point, the series elevates its tone above the campiness that plagues nominal comic vehicles. The story becomes the focus. And with a good story, everything else can fall into place.

Jefferson Pierce is a divorced principal of Garfield High, curbing the vices of the neighborhood from his students and family. He retired his cape nine years ago, but when a villainous crime circuit threatens his two daughters, Black Lightning suits back up. Driven by Pierce’s need to protect his family, he sees his responsibility goes beyond his own front door. The community is plagued with gun violence and drugs. And where there is violence, there are the unjust hands of the police.

The opening scene finds Pierce (Cress Williams) driving home from a school event. Dressed in a suit and tie, along with his two young daughters, the cops pull him over claiming he matches the description of a theft suspect in the area. Pierce exhausts its the third time that month he’s been profiled as his eldest daughter Anissa (Nafessa Williams) records the interaction with her smartphone. The series unabashedly displays and discusses the current Black experience in America. From protests against police brutality, to questions of class within the Black community, its all on deck. And we’re all better for it.

In addition to the topical issues addressed, the Akils have surrounded the show in a tapestry of authentic blackness. A man compares Black Lightning’s costume to a Parliament/Funkadelic outfit. Anissa chides her younger, rebellious sister Jennifer (China McClain) as “fast ass.” The soundtrack – much like Shonda Rhimes’ with Scandal – is syrupy soul and funk, an homage to the 70s original comic. The series opens to the politically-charged anthem “Strange Fruit” made famous by Billie Holiday. The show is a level of blackness never before herald on The CW.

Beyond the great story and rich cultural observance, the hero stuff we actually came for is legit. Black Lightning kicks ass with believable fight scenes and seemingly strong graphics. The pilot skips the clumsy stretch of our protagonist figuring out how their powers work. Instead we see the veteran Pierce reassemble his skills seamlessly. And he’s going to need it facing one of the most gruesome villains in CW history. Arrow had Slade and Flash Zoom, but Lightning brings Tobais – a brutal thug kingpin who harpoons his foot soldiers for discipline. The violence delivers real consequences for our characters and the story, keeping viewers intensely bound to what happens next.

Two episodes in and I’m sold for the season – which promises us at least two more heroes joining the family’s fight. Black Lightning airs Tuesday’s at 9 p.m. ET on The CW or all the time on The CW app.

N.O.T.: Marvel’s ‘The Defenders’ Ep 5-8

nacion.comI finished the series Saturday evening and I must say, after the slow start Marvel’s The Defenders found it’s pace and never ceased to amaze. Once our foursome finally faced their enemy – The Hand – things popped off. Some highlights from the latter episodes without spoiling everything.

  1. Sowande should have been Diamondback | The mysterious man in the white suit recruiting footmen in Harlem should have been Luke’s arch nemesis. It would have connected the Cage series to The Hand from jump, and given us a far more formidable villain after Cottonmouth. He was menacing and cruel without coming off hokey. And he could fight Luke without the help of exploding bullets or juiced up armor. A definite missed opportunity to make Luke Cage a great series rather than just good.
  2. Matt Murdock doesn’t deserve Karen or Foggy | At every turn Matt has to dodge their criticism of him wearing the Daredevil mask. As if he does not know the risk. I don’t know why they could not accept what Matt had long ago realized. It’s who he is and will forever be. Can’t stand the heat, get out of Hell’s Kitchen.
  3. We have to get Daughters of the Dragon | Misty and Colleen have met. The inevitable better be coming. Especially since Rand is handling Misty in her time of need near the end of the series. Give us their show and let us watch Misty and Ms. Wing put in work. They both deserve.
  4. A Problem Like Iron Fist | I still haven’t watched the series, but Danny Rand — at least this iteration — is annoying AF. If he isn’t proclaiming his name like Captain Obvious to anyone who will listen, he’s self-sabotaging his namesake by being a complete idiot. How can the catalyst for this series be the weakest link? By the end he’s more tolerable, but he’s also missing from at least three episodes which helps.
  5. Bring on Jessica Jones S2 | The nonchalant delinquent detective shines throughout the series. Krysten Ritter nails Jones’ perfectly unbothered by everything mentality. And made me thirsty for her story again, which is hands down the best single season of any of the series. ARGUE WITH YOUR MOTHER!

Those are all my points. Let me know what you thought in the comments. Oh, and btw – The Punisher is coming….

Hate Is a Strong Word: ‘The Defenders’ Ep 1-4

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Marvel set a tone for their mature Netflix series beginning with Daredevil, Jessica Jones and the somewhat lukewarm Luke Cage. Accompanying that tone was a level of hype and anticipation with each new series. It’s peak definitely soared with the groundbreaking debut of Cage’s edition. Sadly it was missed with the tumultuous release of the latest hero-for-hire — Iron Fist.  Continue reading Hate Is a Strong Word: ‘The Defenders’ Ep 1-4

No Concessions | Wonder Woman

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My introduction to the Wonder Woman universe was the syndicated 70’s series starring Lynda Carter. I watched in amazement as Diana Prince – in a twirl of light – would transform into her alter ego, the super heroine Amazon. With her bullet-blocking wrist-lets and Lasso of Truth, she fought for justice.

Naturally I was excited to hear WW was finally hitting the big screen. After decades of defunct attempts and that horrible NBC reboot, the first female superhero was going to tell her story. And despite doubt patriarchy conjured at every turn, Wonder Woman exceeded expectations commercially and critically.

First off Gal Gadot was great. The best part of Batman vs Superman continued her streak, doing the role justice. She was equally strong-willed and naive as she entered a world more complicated than the home she knew. Her chemistry with Chris Pine was on point, as he never seemed to outshine her. As Steve Trevor he played greatly as second fiddle to her protagonist.

The fight scenes were awesome and accurately spread out. The opening battle on Themyscira was brilliant, pitting our Amazons against their first sight of man. Also enjoyed Diana’s battle within the village, where she triumphantly leaped into a church steeple taking down a sniper.

As for the villains, they weren’t as menacing as I’d hope. Dr. Poison didn’t have much of a backstory, and neither did her German counterpart. Other than being a part of the Nazi regime, they were pretty basic. I guess this is because Aries remained the ultimate adversary.

I did side-eye the depth of representation. There were WOC on Themyscira, but minimal. I think more time on the oasis may have opened opportunities for more appearances. Also once in London, very little people of color in general. Hopefully we see a stronger effort in the sequel.

Overall I enjoyed the message of hope in the face doubt. Love in the time of war. D.C. hit it out the park, hopefully this continues with the winter debut of Justice League.

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Courtesy of variety.com